Una Boricua y su cámara en Taos Pueblo

September 13, 2019  •  Leave a Comment

Can you imagine living in a same place for over 1,000 years? That’s right, one-zero-zero-zero years! Well, that’s how long the Puebloan people, a Native American tribe situated just a few miles away from Santa Fe, New Mexico, has been living in this 95,000 acres ’piece of land known as Taos, Pueblo.

Its rustic and simple architecture promptly transports you in time. The contrast between the clear blue sky and the reddish-brown adobe constructions makes the landscape “picture perfect.” There are no paved streets, no modern technology nor hustle and bustle that would distract you from admiring the beauty of its surroundings. In fact, it seems almost like a ghost town with almost no people walking around - except for curious tourists. It's basically an opportunity to be present, you and the land. A land that invites you to connect with nature and to reflect on one's priorities.

While there, I wondered how did this civilization managed to survive for so many years? How were they able to convey from generation to generation the importance of conserving its culture? I don't know the correct answers to these questions, but a few concepts come to mind; pride and respect for its history, loyalty, and a deep sense of belonging. - Yes, belonging. Because despite a modern world that threatens with disturbing and altering this community, there is a stronger sense for honoring its history and culture and not changing a thing. 

 

So what did this Boricua learn while in Taos Pueblo? Simple living, having a connection with the land and a sense of authenticity for who you are and where you come from will bring you peace of mind and therefore, longevity. Often times we get caught up in the crazy living of these modern times and we  lose perspective of the things that matters most; family, friends, and home.

Taos, a little ancient town that reminds us that less is more.



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